University of Kentucky Hospital Emergency Departments Add More Security Measures

Emergency department visitors will now be scanned with handheld metal detectors.

University of Kentucky Hospital Emergency Departments Add More Security Measures

Lexington, Kentucky – The University of Kentucky’s (UK) Chandler Hospital and Good Samaritan Hospital have implemented additional security measures to their emergency departments.

Visitors who enter the emergency departments will now be screened by UK police officers with handheld metal detectors, reports UK HealthCare. The new metal detection policy went into effect on Tuesday.

“The new step also offers an opportunity to remind everyone of other measures already in place – or that are being considered – as part of our comprehensive safety efforts,” UK HealthCare said in an article.

Those measures include reminding all healthcare providers and staff members to use employee entrances rather than public entrances. UK HealthCare says this move reduces congestion. Employees who do come in via public entrances will be scanned with a metal detector wand.

Signage reminding everyone that guns and other weapons aren’t permitted at the hospitals have been in place for many years.

UK HealthCare also plans on installing fixed metal detectors at the entrances of its emergency departments.

UK and UK HealthCare officials say the bolstering of the hospitals’ security is in response to increasing reports of violence in healthcare. The Joint Commission’s 2018 Sentinel Event Alert Issue 59 found that 75% of workplace assaults occur in healthcare settings.

Additionally, just last month, Chandler Hospital experienced a close call when a man brought guns and bombs on campus. The suspect, 44-year-old Bryan Carroll, was also wearing body armor.

The suspect was apprehended by UK Police after he left the hospital. UK Police had received a tip from another law enforcement agency that Carroll was on his way to visit a relative at the hospital and should be considered armed and dangerous.

Four IEDs and three more handguns were found in Carroll’s car.

Video surveillance also played an important role in apprehending the suspect. The campus has more than 3,000 security cameras installed.

About the Author

Robin Hattersley Gray
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Robin has been covering the security and campus law enforcement industries since 1998 and is a specialist in school, university and hospital security, public safety and emergency management, as well as emerging technologies and systems integration. She joined CS in 2005 and has authored award-winning editorial on campus law enforcement and security funding, officer recruitment and retention, access control, IP video, network integration, event management, crime trends, the Clery Act, Title IX compliance, sexual assault, dating abuse, emergency communications, incident management software and more. Robin has been featured on national and local media outlets and was formerly associate editor for the trade publication Security Sales & Integration. She obtained her undergraduate degree in history from California State University, Long Beach.

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One response to “University of Kentucky Hospital Emergency Departments Add More Security Measures”

  1. John Driskill says:

    Now they are installing them and officers to run them. Why is it always reactive rather than proactive?

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