How UC San Diego Quintupled Its Case Management Team to Meet Growing Student Needs

UC San Diego’s Student Affairs Case Management Services, the winner of the Clery Center’s Campus Safety Impact Award, has grown exponentially in recent years. Here’s how.

Listen to this podcast using the embedded player below

Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation on college campuses are at an all-time high. More than 60% meet the criteria for at least one mental health problem — a nearly 50% increase since 2013, according to a 2023 Health Minds survey.

The silver lining is college students are also seeking support at an unprecedented rate, openly discussing their struggles with professionals to formulate a game plan for improving their well-being and overall educational experience. Although student affairs offices are overwhelmed with the influx, many are working to find creative ways to properly support students seeking resources — including the University of California San Diego’s Student Affairs Case Management Services (SACM).

SACM is the winner of the Clery Center’s Campus Safety Impact Award, an inaugural award that recognizes higher education programs or initiatives that demonstrate innovation, collaboration, and equity in improving campus safety.

“UC San Diego’s program models the multi-disciplinary and proactive approach to campus safety that Clery Center champions, and we are glad to have the opportunity to recognize their leadership in prioritizing student health and well-being,” Jessica Mertz, Clery Center’s executive director, said of SACM’s win.

SACM was founded in 2014 to establish a culture of care on campus through comprehensive support services that empower students to address not only their mental health struggles but all aspects of their health and well-being.

Many UC San Diego graduate students have dependents, leading SACM to expand its services offered to these individuals.

“Our office is focused on providing non-clinical case management to all of our students — undergraduate students, graduate students, and professional students. We also do consultation services and provide resources to our staff and faculty to support students in distress,” SACM Director Andrew Hua, told Campus Safety (00:15). “We do this through crisis prevention or intervention, we assist students in identifying options, challenges, and barriers, and then help them find  solutions to overcome them. In addition to that, we promote growth and self-advocacy while connecting students to campus and community resources. Students with dependents is [also] a service that continues to grow within our department.”

What makes his department unique, says Hua, is its multi-disciplinary team which consists of both social workers with clinical backgrounds and higher education professionals (03:03). They also offer peer-to-peer support programs for students who might not be comfortable speaking to a professional.

Success doesn’t come without its challenges. From 2020 to 2023, the team quintupled in size as it continued to evolve to meet students’ growing needs (12:27).

“The challenge with growing a department so quickly is just being able to build the infrastructure, the training, the onboarding, and building consistent practices with so many staff and so many coming through,” said Hua. “You’re going through not only recruitment, but you’re also thinking about how do you make sure that your staff who you end up hiring knows what they need to know so that they can do their job. And even think about their professional development, think about their retention, think about how they can take care of themselves while doing some very emotionally laborious work. I think there’s so many facets to it.”

Quintupling the team, however, means bringing in fresh world perspectives and a wide range of unique capabilities.

“The more individuals we have on our team, that means they bring amazing assets. So tapping into those individuals and seeing that I hired them for a reason, they bring something to this campus. I don’t have to do it all by myself, so how do I engage them?” continued Hua. “And also helping me develop, build the infrastructure, build consistent practices so we can progress and propel our services to our students. So I think the main challenge is that with all these resources, making sure we have the infrastructure to support the staff that are doing the work.”

Contributing to the success of this significant growth is continued collaboration with leadership, Hua says (15:16). When he started with the department as interim director, he reported directly to the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs.

“When I sat down with her, I often was not only giving updates on what she would need to know so that she can inform her leadership and also navigate the resources appropriately, but she also was genuinely checking on how well I was doing, how my team was doing,” he said. “Her and I have a great relationship where I will be as transparent as possible — here are our struggles, here’s where our students are at, here’s where additional resources can be beneficial. I think over the years, she’s heard a couple of these anecdotes and has been planning, so when I stepped into my current role as director, there were already conversations that had begun about how we can increase the number of case managers on my team.”

Some of the SACM team pose for a photo.

Hua also ensures the rest of his team, including new hires, meets with campus partners as often as possible to develop rapport (19:19). Some key partnerships include the counseling center, the student retention department, and the equity, diversity, and inclusion office.

“We have an onboarding checklist and all of them have key campus partners we work with. We ask them to visit their offices, set up meetings — so that’s built in — and we give our campus partners a heads up,” Hua described. “Sometimes we will even schedule them in. We’ll say, ‘Hey, we want you to meet our new staff. Please come to one of our meetings. We’ll pick the date and time that works best for you or we’ll have them meet you at your office.'”

This continued collaboration also benefits students as they feel they are not just being forwarded to another office once they reach out to SACM.

“We know our campus partners by name, we know their work, so when we build rapport with our students, we can definitively share, ‘Hey, I know this individual by name from this office. I know their work. They’re amazing. Do you mind if I connect you with them? Do you mind if they come to one of our meetings?’ Students, they see, ‘I’m not just given general resources. I’m not just given a bank of resources for me to figure out on my own. I’m being able to navigate that with someone who’s a professional staff, who’s willing to navigate that with me.'”

Additional topics discussed in the interview include:

  • How the team has addressed spikes in student caseloads (06:04)
  • How the team has created a path for students to become part of the staff (14:45)
  • Tips for garnering support from leadership for student well-being initiatives (16:43)
  • SACM’s signature training program, which has trained over 1,200 faculty, staff, and student leaders to recognize signs of distress (22:10)
  • Notable statistics, including student testimonials, that highlight SACM’s impact (24:26)
  • Tips for schools overwhelmed with student needs’ caseloads (27:36)

The full interview transcript is below and includes subhead descriptions to help break up the discussion into easily digestible parts.

Watch the full interview here or listen on-the-go on Apple or Spotify.

 


Amy Rock (00:00): I’m here today with Andrew Hua, who is the director of Student Affairs case Management Services at uc, San Diego. And Andrew, I was just hoping that you could give a general overview of what your department is and does and also how it came to be.

Andrew Hua (00:15): Yeah, happy to do so and it’s nice to just be here. Thank you for the opportunity to share with all of you. Student Affairs Case Management at UC San Diego, our office is focused on providing nonclinical case management and it’s to all our students — undergraduate students, graduate students, professional students. In addition to not only the nonclinical case management support, but we also do the consultation services and provide resources to our staff and faculty. So many ways we do this through engaging crisis prevention or intervention. We assist students in identifying options, challenges, barriers, and then help them find solutions to overcome them. In addition to that, promoting growth and self-advocacy while connecting students to campus resources and community resources. And there’s been a lot that we continue to do, but I also want to recognize where we also came from.

So we’re a unique system at UC San Diego. We have a very robust eight college system and it continues to grow. Student affairs case management was first created within the undergraduate college system because they saw a need to help support students in distress, especially those who need continual support and navigate the challenges they face at the UC system. And I would say there’s a continuous definite need for additional support. And what has happened over the years, basic needs has grown from our department. Students with dependents is a service that continues to grow within our department. So that’s where we all started. We started within the colleges and as we continue to see an increase of need, we were shifted into a more central model to serve all students beyond just undergrads. We serve now all undergrad grad students and professional students.

Amy Rock (02:11): I feel like a lot of times people might forget about grad students because you think they’re a little bit older, they’re able to manage stress or situations that they’re going through, and that’s not the case. So that’s great that you take them into consideration as well.

Andrew Hua (02:26): Yeah, absolutely. And I think we continue to expand and find ways to support them both with their basic needs and some of their health and wellbeing challenges. And it’s a growing population in regards to even students with dependents. Most of our grad students are individuals who are caregivers and care for others. So I’m excited we’re able to continue to evolve and support more students and also our colleagues who support those students.

Amy Rock (02:50): And so when you say nonclinical, that means if there’s more significant issues that need to be addressed, they’d be referenced to a counselor or someone who has a degree in mental health or whatever struggles that they’re dealing with?

Andrew Hua (03:03): Yeah, our staff is amazing. We’re a multi-disciplinary staff where we have a mixture of both higher education professionals and our social workers. And our social workers do have some clinical background. They don’t apply their clinical diagnoses or experience directly, but they do have that background that helps inform next steps how to provide trauma-informed care, inclusive care, student-centered care. So a mixture of our higher ed expertise and then social work expertise gives us a unique approach of supporting students on campus.

Amy Rock (03:40): Now the main reason why we wanted to have the chat is that you are the winner of the Clery Center’s Campus Safety Impact Award. What do you feel makes the program or your services stand out?

Andrew Hua (03:56): And that’s a great segue. I think what makes us unique is that ability to be multidisciplinary. Having both lenses, both educational backgrounds to consider when we approach students, engage students. I think that’s unique. I think we approach every student through a multidisciplinary trauma-informed and student-centered lens when we try to care for our students. I think the other thing that comes to mind is we very much are focused on how do we do the self-advocacy for the students, advocate for them as professional staff but also look at it through an innovative and growing approach. We continue to look at our systems and how we continue to expand our services. And a couple of those things that come to mind are things we shared about basic needs. Basic needs first started in case management, now it’s its own department and it’s flourishing.

And then we start to think about students with dependents. Now we have staff that are focused and dedicated to students with dependents. And we additionally identified this past year students sometimes don’t want to come to a staff or a faculty member to ask for help or ask for help for the simplest questions. So we now have a trying to try in program, which is a peer-to-peer support system. And that’s grown. We now have staff for that. We have student staff for the first time in our office. So I think what makes us unique is there’s always an approach on care and creating culture of care with also innovation and growth. And I think that’s where we continue to evolve in. And I’m excited. I think there’s more to come and I think that’s probably what makes us unique.

Amy Rock (05:40): I think you need to be innovative, especially today. I just imagine things going on globally and societal changes and discourse just change the course of students’ needs and being able to adjust to that is key. And it sounds like by having a multidisciplinary team, you’re able to pivot in situations when you need to.

Andrew Hua (05:59): 100%. It’s very much needed and we are adapting every day.

Amy Rock (06:04): I had some insight into your services and I saw that from the academic year 2018-2019 to the next year, there was a significant spike in student cases and needs. Do you know if that was directly linked to the struggles of COVID or do you believe there are other factors that play? Because if it was COVID related, I would’ve assumed the more drastic spike would be between the next two school years, so 2019-2020 to 2020-2021.

Andrew Hua (06:34): Yeah. That’s great. And I’m a data informed individual, so I love data. And one of the things I’ll share, I reflected a bit about this, and one of the things that I saw happened was that was actually the year the basic needs hub center actually opened. So one of our partnerships with basic needs is we actually utilize the same database network on how we capture data on when a student reaches out for support, how we provide support. So their data is also something we help support in navigating. And with the basic needs hub opening up during that time, our students needed basic needs support during COVID. They were figuring out how to feed themselves, how to navigate the changes of the learning environment. Some of them even needed support and finding housing. Our housing was very limited. It was much for our students and just being mindful of COVID.

So with the hub basic needs opening up during that year as well, that was the year students were like, “Oh my gosh, there’s a basic needs hub. There’s someone that is dedicated to addressing my needs for basic needs, housing and food insecurity.” So that’s where we see an uptick.

And then just like you were sharing, Amy, we have seen the uptick in the continuous year about COVID. So COVID did impact us so that’s where I see the data being played in. There’s that linkage. In addition to that, I would also share not only COVID-19, but we look at 2019 to 2020, the new inaugural position of case manager and outreach specialist, which was my position when I first started, started that time too. So that was a dedicated position who also increased graduate student support, dedicated position that is focused on students with dependents. So we also captured those cases within our data as well.

Amy Rock (08:39): That makes sense because students are interested in it, a new system, and then they might not be back the following school year because your group is able to address a need that they have.

And you did mention housing and food insecurity, which I just wanted to note is so common on college campuses. And I think a lot of people, unless they’re directly involved in putting programs in place to address this, they don’t realize that that’s a thing because in their head, they think they go to college, obviously they can afford housing, they can afford food, and that just really isn’t the case, especially for first-generation college students.

Andrew Hua (09:18): 100%. And I can’t say any better because it’s complex. When we think about our students that enter college or transfer to college, there’s a lot of things to learn and a lot of challenges. And our systems are big. So how do we help our students navigate the system? And that’s what I think case management and our college partners can definitely help them do.

Amy Rock (09:45): I also saw a chart of case types handled by your department, which included mental wellbeing, academics, and physical health. But mental wellbeing was by far the most common case in the last school year. Has that always been the case in recent years or has that fluctuated? Like you said, it started right before COVID, so I’m imagining mental wellbeing has been consistently on the top of the list for the last couple of years.

Andrew Hua (10:14): Amy, you’re absolutely correct. Fortunately and unfortunately that is the case. Mental health wellbeing has continuously been at the top of our reports. And when I say fortunately, unfortunately, there’s a mixed review of that. And one thing I look at it, it’s great to see students seek out support, being able to come forward, ask for help. I think it also adds to removing some of the stigma for asking for help. So one of the things I would add to that I wish, and I continue to wish, to have more resources to support them. I think that’s what I reflect on as we continue to see the numbers climb. I also think in the helping profession, it’s also difficult to see that there’s a ton of folks who want help and need mental health services. But I think that I’d rather students ask for help than not ask for help and try to figure out on their own. And sometimes that leads to more severe cases. So for me, it’s a mixed feeling. It’s great to see those number increase because they’re asking for help or we’re finding ways to connect with them. But also it’s like now that we see them coming forward, how do we best support them? What are the resources we need? So those are things I continuously think about.

Amy Rock (11:38): Kind of similar to — we report this on Campus Safety — but campus crime, just because a campus has higher reported crime, that likely means there are stronger processes in place or students are encouraged to report crime versus campuses to give this persona or overview that we don’t have crime problem on our campus. We don’t have mental health problems on our campus. So just seeing that many students willing to come out and discuss their mental health, I think it’s just society in general is changing. And there’s always been significant amount of people struggling with mental health since the beginning of time, and now they’re just more comfortable with speaking about it, which is amazing.

Andrew Hua (12:19): Absolutely. My hope is that now we can build the infrastructure and the resources support that climbing number.

Amy Rock (12:27): Throughout our entire society. And now in some of the literature I looked at from 2020 to 2023, I think I’m getting those years right, your team essentially quintupled. What were some of the challenges in growing the department that much in a short period of time?

Andrew Hua (12:50): There are a number of challenges, but it’s also exciting, it’s innovation. It’s also seeing the support from senior leadership or campus leadership is also exciting. The challenge I would say, growing a department so quickly with so many folks, is just being able to build the infrastructure, the training, the onboarding, and building consistent practices with so many staff and so many coming through. I think it’s exciting. You’re going through not only recruitment, you’re also thinking about how do you make sure that your staff who you end up hiring knows what they need to know so they can do their job and then think about their professional development, think about their retention, think about how they can take care of themselves while doing some very emotionally laborious work. So I think there’s so many facets to it.

And I think the one thing I will share is that the more individuals we have on our team, that means they bring amazing assets. So tapping into those individuals and seeing, I hired them for a reason, they bring something to this campus. I don’t have to do it all by myself. So how do I engage them? And also helping me develop, build the infrastructure, build consistent practices so we can progress and propel our services to our students. So I think that’s the main challenge is that with all these resources, making sure we have the infrastructure to support the staff that are doing the work.

Amy Rock (14:23): And the more employees you have also means more likely the more diverse views and life experiences you bring in for students to be more likely to relate to themselves. If they’re able to speak to someone who has similar life experiences or backgrounds or family upbringings, it just makes it that much easier for them to open up.

Andrew Hua (14:45): Yes, absolutely. 100%. And we’ve built systems in place to have that pipeline from students who have been grad students that have done this work to becoming a professional on our staff. And then beyond, if they want to go into the clinical route for some of our social workers, we were building a pathway for them to when they get their clinical hours and also become clinical professionals as well. So it’s continuously growing.

Amy Rock (15:16): And you had mentioned support from leadership. Was it challenging at all convincing them that there was a significant needs to be met? Like you said, data is kind of hard to ignore, so you definitely want to show that to them. And if there were any challenges, how were you able to overcome that or acknowledge that?

Andrew Hua (15:37): I’m happy to share that. When it comes to challenges with leadership, I honestly felt I got more support because when I started my role as interim director, we reported directly to the vice Chancellor of Student Affairs at our campus. So when I sat down with the vice chancellor, I often was not only giving her updates on what she would need to know so that she can inform her leadership and also navigate the resources appropriately, but she also was genuinely checking on how well I was doing, how my team was doing, and her and I have a great relationship where I will be as transparent as possible — here are our struggles, here’s where our students are at, here’s where additional resources can be beneficial. I think over the years, she’s heard a couple of these anecdotes and has been planning. So when I stepped into the role, there were already conversations that had begun about how do we increase the number of case managers on my team.

But I’ll also share what has been helpful in propelling in moving that forward — it’s great to have that idea, but seeing action and moving forward — one of the things I think about is data. Like I shared earlier, Amy, I love data. I try to be data informed in my practices. So I look at HECMA, which is our Higher Education Case Management Association, NBIDA, which is National Behavioral Intervention Team Association, our CAST standards with NASPA and higher education. I bring all of that in. I’d bring the recommendations, benchmarking where we are, and trying to figure out where are we at and where we need to be. So I would say when I started interim, I was like, I’m open to program reviews. I’m open to being audited — even in doing a self-audit, I’m open to. And that helped me and my team realize where our gaps are, where our areas of enhancement need to be.

And I bring that all forward. I bring that all forward to my leadership. And honestly, that probably pushed forward in regards to we know you need resources, your data is very helpful, we’re going to make sure that’s a priority. So that’s been helpful a lot in regards to navigating leadership and encouraging change. But for the most part, I will share, I’m very lucky to have an amazing vice chancellor and now a wonderful assistant vice chancellor who support me and the work that we do because they’ve seen what we do. They’ve seen us on the ground, they’ve seen us engage with students, and I think that’s important too, just to see what we do also impacts our students. And I survey my students as well, those students who see us, I survey them and I get their anecdotes and I share that forward. So that’s been my relationship leadership and their support.

Amy Rock (18:33): I feel like unfortunately, I’ve heard from a lot of Campus Safety readers that trying to convince leadership to budget for student wellbeing or even safety initiatives can be a struggle, especially if they’re working from one budget for various campus needs. I’m glad that you’re one of the lucky ones.

Andrew Hua (18:50): I am fortunate, and I would say legislation also helps. I try to be on top of what’s happening in the state legislation to see is there an impact on my office. At one point, there was a bill that was introduced that every threat, even any notice of threat, would possibly come to my office. And I was like, “Ooh, how do I prepare my staff and also prepare the institution?” So I try to keep on top of what’s happening outside our institution too that can impact us.

Amy Rock (19:19): That’s great. Now, you had mentioned boots on the ground. I know as part of your general case management services and support, developing a positive rapport with students and also campus partners is a priority. How do you make this a priority? How do you make that happen?

Andrew Hua (19:35): One of the things to ensure my students and the campus partners have good rapport with my team, I’ll start off with the staff first. Everyone who’s onboarded, whether it’s a graduate case manager, professional staff, we ensure that they are meeting with our campus partners. We have a onboarding checklist and all of them have key campus partners we work with. And we ask them visit their office, set up meetings, so that’s built in and we give our campus partners a heads up. Sometimes we will even schedule them in. We’ll say, “Hey, we want you to meet our new staff. Please come into one of our meetings. We’ll pick the date and time that works best for you, or we’ll have them meet you at your office.”

So that’s where I think the partnership continues to grow is that we continue to make efforts to do some reconnections as well, and that’s a yearly basis because we have new graduate assistants come in. We’re always reaching back out to our counseling center, our student retention colleagues, our EDI centers, and we’re like, “Hey, we have new staff. We want to reconnect.” Also, it’s a great time for us as professional staff, just see how you’re doing and the work that you’re doing. So that continues the partnership and growth.

I think where we see this pan out for our students is because we have this relationship, the students feel like they’re not being just forwarded onto another office. We know our campus partners by name, we know our campus partners and their work. So when we build rapport with our students, we can definitively share, “Hey, I know this individual by name from this office. I know their work. They’re amazing. Do you mind if I connect you with them? Do you mind if they come to one of our meetings that we set up?” So I think from our students, they see, “I’m not just given general resources. I’m not just given a bank of resources for me to just figure out on my own. I’m being able to navigate that with someone else on campus who’s a professional staff, who’s willing to navigate that with me.”

And we come into contact with all kinds of students — students who may not be ready or have the confidence or have the skills to say, “I’m going to go reach out myself.” So how do we build that warm connection for them? And I think that’s a conglomerate of great partnerships on campus with our students, building that partnership with us. And I think that’s been able to increase our rapport and trust and then positive relationships.

Amy Rock (22:10): Awesome. Well said. And now I know that your department also has a signature training program, which has trained over 1,200 faculty, staff, and student leaders. Can you just talk about that program a little bit and why it’s important and its impact?

Andrew Hua (22:23): I think the importance is we’ve been seeing a lot of questions on how do we help students in distress? How do we navigate that in the classroom? How do I navigate that in the workplace? So it’s really focused on outreach, prevention and early alert. We want campus partners to be part of creating culture of care. We share how to identify students in distress, options on how to offer support, and then also receive consultation. We are in an office where we will be there. If you’ve had interactions and you’re just like, “I don’t know how to navigate this, can you help us? What resources would you recommend?” We will do that. We want to approach every event or every interaction with care and community.

And in those trainings, we provide scenarios, and we have them practiced those scenarios as well, like how to navigate those. So it’s not only let’s consume and absorb some of the resources, but how do I actually apply that? And based on data from staff, faculty and students, they feel more confident in identifying and offering support for those students in distress, so I think that’s why it’s so important. We continue to grow it, we continue to enhance it, and we use, again, data — data that we from our national organizations — so we not only help our faculty and staff address them, but we keep them in the know of the trends, the challenges and what to expect. I think that also helps them navigate the classroom and how they support their students as well.

Amy Rock (24:00): It’s so critical for them to recognize changes in behavior or changes in academic success because they’re seeing them on a regular basis and they have a sense of their base level ways of being and can hopefully help mitigate concerns or point them to someone who can, if they’re exhibiting any concerning behaviors or changes before it escalates to something more.

Andrew Hua (24:23): Yes, 100%. And there are a lot more students than staff. So if we can get staff to get on a same page of how we create a culture of care, I think that only enhances the student experience.

Amy Rock (24:36): Do you have any notable statistics on the programs impact on campus that you’d like to share?

Andrew Hua (24:43): I think there are a couple, and I’m happy to share with you, Amy. So our website does have an impact report. A lot of information on there, and I’ve shared the link in the chat with you. Hopefully you can share that with your community, but that impact report really outlays what we’ve done within 2021 and 2022. It gives a good robust picture. We tend to do impact reports every other year to kind of capture the impact we’re making on campus. This is just our latest one that’s available.

One of the things I’ll share is that some notable statistics, I think one of the biggest statistics is how do we tell our students’ story? And I’d like to take a moment to just share a couple notes from our students. One note was: “My case manager, Kevin,  has been super helpful and kind. He is really thoughtful and considerate, which has made such a difference in my interactions with him. He’s also super proactive with regards to communication, which makes me feel much more supported and less alone than most of the other campus resources. I’m so grateful for his help.”

Another student shared, “My case manager, Annie, is always lovely and welcoming. I always feel relieved and relaxed while accessing her via email and in person. She’s always caring. Since she knows I am an international student who does not use English as her first language, I could access Annie to find out valuable resources on campus.” And I think these two, and there’s plenty more I could probably read off, but just these two statistics as anecdotes, as stories from our students, speak heavily on the work that they do. And I am so grateful to be working with these case managers.

And the last statistic I’ll share is from the staff perspective. When we do these trainings, these signature trainings, the staff has shared, “The way we worked together to come up with a solution was helpful. And I absolutely respect and always agree with my case manager because he’s an experienced person who knows how to handle and work with someone who’s under crisis.” So those are just some notable statistics and anecdotes. I am just glad to share and hopefully that provides you a picture of how we make an impact on campus.

Amy Rock (27:04): That’s amazing. Thank you. And I think for some people they might not have come from a home that showed that support and warmth, so being able to be that and offer that to students who are going through one of the biggest changes in their life — living on their own, being away for a lot of people for the first time — is just really crucial for a lot of people.

Andrew Hua (27:24): Absolutely.

Amy Rock (27:25): For a college campus that might be overwhelmed with their current student needs’ case load — and I would imagine more campuses are than aren’t — what pieces of advice do you have for them?

Andrew Hua (27:36): So there are a couple of things I think about. There’s three things. One, how can you implement data informed practices? [Two is] advocacy. I think advocacy in the sense of not only student advocacy, self-advocacy, but staff advocacy. And the third is sun setting practices. When I say sun setting, I mean when have we looked at our practices? We have better ways to do this or it’s no longer needed. How can we sunset certain practices or work expectations because they no longer are relevant or as needed? So when I think about those various services, I do reevaluate our mission, our values, our services consistently in my own reflection. And I do that with my team on occasion. And if certain things no longer are in alignment with our mission, our services, our values, then I need to change it and prioritize it, finding different innovative practices.

One of the practices and systems we have is our graduate assistant program. Our graduate assistant program has helped with caseload. They are master level students who are coming from social work and higher education, learning how to navigate students in distress, so they’re helping with some of the caseload work. We’re building a licensing pipeline so case managers, professional staff who one day want to become a licensed clinical social worker, there is a program that we help deviate the cost of getting a license. They’ll get the clinical supervision through our colleagues on campus, and once that’s completed, then they will get their license and they can pursue future opportunities.

And then last thing I would share cost sharing. I have amazing campus partners who see the value in the work that we do and the importance. And for us to increase staff, it requires funding and finances, so some colleagues are sharing, :I’d love to have a graduate case manager. I’d love to have a case manager within our department that serves our specific students. Can we do that?” And I’m like, awesome. Let’s look at the data. Let’s look at how much it would cost, how much would it cost for your department to cost share and us to onboard, et cetera. So cost sharing is another piece. So those are a few practices I would recommend. Hopefully that’s helpful.

Amy Rock (30:07): Yeah, very. I just want to say thank you so much for sharing with me. And again, congratulations on winning the Clery Center’s Campus Safety Impact Award. The Clery Center has been a great partner for us and a great resource and has helped me in a lot of research that I’ve done, so being a winner of that award speaks volumes to the work that you and your team are doing. So congratulations, and I’m sure you get very little sleep with the job that you have. So thank you for what you do in making a change.

Andrew Hua (30:37): Yeah, I will say, I just want to say thank you for acknowledging our work, awarding us the inaugural award and our staff is ecstatic. I can’t tell you enough. We all cheered and were having a good time when it was presented to us. And the only thing I will share is that we are grateful for the community and the practice that we have, not only with Clery, but also the many organizations. We only do the great work that we do because we are able to rely on some great professional development and professional associations, so just want to acknowledge how grateful we are for being recognized for the work that we did.

If you appreciated this podcast and want to receive more valuable industry content like this, click here to sign up for our FREE digital newsletters!

About the Author

Contact:

Amy is Campus Safety’s Executive Editor. Prior to joining the editorial team in 2017, she worked in both events and digital marketing.

Amy has many close relatives and friends who are teachers, motivating her to learn and share as much as she can about campus security. She has a minor in education and has worked with children in several capacities, further deepening her passion for keeping students safe.

Get Our Newsletters
Campus Safety HQ