UPDATE: Accused School Shooter Told He Was Losing Job

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.

A 48-year-old fourth-grade teacher at Inskip Elementary School has been charged with two counts of attempted first-degree murder for allegedly shooting the principal and vice principal of the school on Feb. 10. Shortly before the shooting, the suspect had been informed by the victims that his employment contract would not be extended.

Mark Stephen Foster allegedly shot Principal Elisa Luna and Assistant Principal Amy Brace shortly before 1 p.m., about an hour after students were dismissed early because of snow, Chron.com reports. No students were harmed during the incident.

The Associated Press reports that before the shooting, Foster had been told that his contract was not going to be renewed for the following year.  According to USA Today, Foster had a history of exhibiting threatening behavior.

Additionally, KnoxNews.com reports that Foster’s 49-year-old brother Anthony, had sent an anonymous tip to school officials in November telling them that the suspect was a “ticking time bomb.” Knox County Schools officials, however, say they properly vetted Mark Stephen Foster. (Article continues below.)

He was arrested near the school after his car was stopped at a construction roadblock. According to police, he surrendered without incident.

Knox County Schools Superintendent James McIntyre Jr. said he was not sure what prompted Luna to terminate Foster’s contract, although personnel records indicate that a week before the shooting, Luna reprimanded Foster after receiving a complaint that he yelled at students.

In addition to being charged with two counts of attempted first-degree murder, Foster faces an unlawful possession of a gun on school property charge.

Foster is being held on $1 million bond.

For additional information, click here.

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