N.C. School Employees Must Now Be Trained to Spot Sex Trafficking, Abuse

The training should cover prevention, how sexual predators groom their victims, warning signs, how to intervene, legal responsibilities and resources that can provide assistance.

N.C. School Employees Must Now Be Trained to Spot Sex Trafficking, Abuse

As of January 1, all North Carolina school districts are required to select a training program that will teach employees how to report and prevent child sexual abuse and sex trafficking.

It’s now a misdemeanor for an adult to not notify authorities when they suspect or know of a child who is being physically or sexually abused, reports the Fayetteville Observer.

The training should cover prevention, how sexual predators groom their victims, warning signs, how to intervene, legal responsibilities and resources that can provide assistance.

The change in requirements were unanimously approved by lawmakers this past fall in Senate Bill 199. Additionally, the statute of limitations has been extended for civil suits against predators who sexually assault children. Other protections of children have also been implemented.

The passage of Senate Bill 199 and updated training requirements were prompted by the high rate of human trafficking in North Carolina, believed by some experts to be one of the highest in the United States.

Nationally, more than nine in 10 of all sexual abuse victims know their abuser, and 88% of the perpetrators are male. However, it is estimated that only a third of child sexual abuse incidents and cases are identified and even fewer are reported.

Campus Safety has previously reported extensively on child sexual abuse, as well as how to report it and prevent it. The following are helpful resources:

About the Author

Robin Hattersley Gray
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Robin has been covering the security and campus law enforcement industries since 1998 and is a specialist in school, university and hospital security, public safety and emergency management, as well as emerging technologies and systems integration. She joined CS in 2005 and has authored award-winning editorial on campus law enforcement and security funding, officer recruitment and retention, access control, IP video, network integration, event management, crime trends, the Clery Act, Title IX compliance, sexual assault, dating abuse, emergency communications, incident management software and more. Robin has been featured on national and local media outlets and was formerly associate editor for the trade publication Security Sales & Integration. She obtained her undergraduate degree in history from California State University, Long Beach.

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